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Pennington Biomedical Research Center Study Finds Bedroom TV Viewing Increases Risk of Obesity in Children

Released: Tuesday, December 11, 2012

BATON ROUGE, LA - A new research study from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center found that having a bedroom TV and TV viewing time were related to childhood obesity, and specifically high waist circumference. The study, entitled “Television, Adiposity, and Cardiometabolic Risk in Children and Adolescents,” was published today in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

The average American child from age 8 to 18 watches about 4.5 hours of TV each day. Seventy percent have a TV in the bedroom and about one-third of youth aged 6-19 is considered obese. Previous studies have shown that TV viewing time during childhood and adolescence continues into adulthood, resulting in overweight and elevated total cholesterol. This study, led by Pennington Biomedical researcher Peter Katzmarzyk, Ph.D., professor and LPFA Endowed Chair, found that TV viewing time was related to visceral adiposity, and bedroom TV was related to cardiometabolic risk in children.

“The established association between TV and obesity is predominantly based on BMI. The association between TV and fat mass, adiposity stored in specific depots (including abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue), and cardiometabolic risk, is less well understood,” says Katzmarzyk. “It is hypothesized that higher levels of TV viewing and the presence of a TV in the bedroom are associated with depot-specific adiposity and cardiometabolic risk.”

Between 2010 and 2011, 369 children and adolescents aged 5-18 in Baton Rouge, representing a balance between gender, ethnicity, age, and BMI status, were evaluated for a variety of factors, such as waist circumference, resting blood pressure, fasting triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and glucose, fat mass, and stomach fat.

Statistical analysis of the data developed produced two models. Together, these models revealed that children with a TV in the bedroom were more likely to watch more TV. These children also were shown to have more fat and subcutaneous adipose tissue mass, as well as higher waist circumference, when compared with their peers who did not have a bedroom TV. Study participants with a TV in the bedroom and those who watched TV more than two hours a day were each associated with up to 2.5 times the odds of the highest levels of fat mass. Viewing five or more hours a day produced an association of two times the odds of being in the top quartile for visceral adipose tissue mass. Further, a bedroom TV associated with three times the odds of elevated cardiometabolic risk, elevated waist circumference, and elevated triglycerides.

“There was a stronger association between having a TV in the bedroom versus TV viewing time, with the adiposity and health outcomes,” notes study co-author Amanda Staiano, PhD. “A bedroom TV may create additional disruptions to healthy habits, above and beyond regular TV viewing. For instance, having a bedroom TV is related to lower amounts of sleep and lower prevalence of regular family meals, independent of total TV viewing time. Both short sleep duration and lack of regular family meals have been related to weight gain and obesity.”

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NOTES FOR EDITORS
“Television, Adiposity, and Cardiometabolic Risk in Children and Adolescents,” by Amanda E. Staiano, PhD; Deirdre M. Harrington, PhD; Stephanie T. Broyles, PhD; Alok K. Gupta, MD; Peter T. Katzmarzyk, PhD (DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2012.09.049). It appears in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 44, Issue 1 (January 2013), published by Elsevier.
Full text of the article is available to credentialed journalists upon request; contact Beverly Lytton at 858-534-9340 or eAJPM@ucsd.edu. Journalists wishing to interview the authors should contact Dr. Peter Katzmarzyk at Pennington Biomedical Research Center at 225-763-2536 or Peter.Katzmarzyk@pbrc.edu.

 ABOUT THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
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About the Louisiana Clinical and Translational Science (LA CaTS) Center
The LA CaTS Center is comprised of three primary collaborating institutions in the state, including LSU's Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans, and Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans – and also includes six research partners: LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, and in New Orleans, Xavier University of Louisiana, Children’s Hospital, Ochsner Health System, Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System, and University Medical Center.  The LA CaTS Center’s vision for Louisiana encompasses the strengths and capacities unique to each member institution and represents a unified, comprehensive approach for targeting prevention, care and research of chronic diseases in the underserved population.  The scholar program is supported in part by U54 GM104940 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health which funds the Louisiana Clinical and Translational Science Center.  For more information, please visit www.lacats.org.